Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Celebrating great storytelling. How many different ways can you tell a story?

The Stage 3 students have been exploring great stories and looking at the different ways that stories can be told. We have adapted Shakespeare's tale of Romeo and Juliet to create our Wakakirri story - Star of the Sea, as well as  exploring other versions and adaptations of this story.







We also attended the recent Marist production of Odyssey and enjoyed comparing how stories from The Odyssey have been used in modern literature such as The Percy Jackson series. Some students have even been inspired to write their own version of the Odyssey set in a modern day Race Around the World!



What does it mean that we are becoming a “Newman” Selective School?




The Newman Gifted Program commenced in 2012 as the Newman Research and Development Program. The aim of the program is to improve provision for gifted and talented students in Archdiocesan Catholic schools by the systematic development of a whole school program in gifted education and thus to provide a Kindergarten to Year 12 pathway for gifted and talented students.
At the end of a three year process of professional learning and implementation of policies and programs, a school will apply to become a fully accredited Newman School at which point they are entitled to use the Newman Gifted Program logo on all school correspondence and advertising.
At St Mary’s we are in the second year of this process. Our focus in 2017 is on streamlining our identification processes, along with up-skilling and supporting all staff with professional learning opportunities to ensure quality differentiation and suitably challenging learning opportunities are offered to gifted students within class.

What does gifted mean?



The Gifted Education policy at St Mary’s adopts Françoys Gagne’s definitions of giftedness and talent as identified in his Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent (2010, DMGT 2.0).  


Giftedness designates the possession and use of untrained and spontaneously expressed outstanding natural abilities or aptitudes (called gifts), in at least one ability domain, to a degree that places an individual at least among the top 10% of age peers.  

Talent designates the outstanding mastery of systematically developed competencies (knowledge and skills) in at least one field of human activity to a degree that places an individual at least among the top 10% of ‘learning peers’ (those who have accumulated a similar amount of learning time from either current or past training) (Gagne, 2010, p. 82).

Underachievers are defined as students who show a discrepancy between their school performance and some index of his or her actual ability.  (Davis & Rimm 2004)

Our approach to Gifted Education as a Sydney Catholic School



‘I have come that they may have life and have it to the full’ John 10:10
The Gifted Education Policy for systemic Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Sydney is set within the context of the Church’s mission to evangelise, and is founded upon the Vision and Mission Statements and the Archbishop’s Charter for Catholic Schools.

Pope Francis in his book ‘Education for Choosing Life’ refers to education as ‘an act of hope’. Faith and the Christian vision of humanity fuel that hope. As partners in Catholic Education, Sydney Catholic Schools are committed to supporting this challenge by Pope Francis to fuel hope in all our students through fostering the attainment of their full human potential.

Our Archbishop’s Charter amplifies this challenge in item 2, where our schools are called to:

“Nurture students’ love of learning through a Catholic pedagogy that fosters the development of the intellect, moral knowledge, understanding and reasoning in a relational, social and cultural context.”

(The Archbishop’s Charter for Catholic Schools, Archdiocese of Sydney, Item 2, July 2011)

According to Gagne’s definitions and model (2009) gifted students represent about ten per cent of the student population in Sydney Catholic Schools. This calls for a differentiated response in every school to the educational needs of these students. At St Mary’s we believe that all learners have the right to receive an education that is responsive to their needs and the provision of an appropriate educational program for the gifted is an issue of equity.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Emotional intensity in gifted children

This article by Lesley Sword explores and explains emotional intensity in gifted individuals. A number of traits of emotionally intensity are described. Strategies for parents are suggested to help their emotionally intense gifted children to accept themselves as they are.






The latest GERRiC newsletter contains some great opportunities including a parent course on underachievement and upcoming Gifted Ed conferences.

PARENT WORKSHOPS: GERRIC is rolling out some new workshops to meet the needs of parents who want to explore certain topics in more depth than is possible in the weekend Parent Course. The next specialised parent course will take place in July and will be facilitated by Ruth Phillips.The topic for the day will be 'Underachievement prevention and support'
GERRIC - Specialised Parent Courses

Wednesday, 15 June 2016

What does Gifted Education look like at St Mary’s?

What does Gifted Education look like at St Mary’s?


  • Trained specialist teachers work in different capacities in the school. In 2017 this involves our Newman Extension English and Maths group in Stage 3, along with supporting identified students within other grades to ensure quality differentiation is occurring in all classrooms. In addition to this, these teachers lead the Professional Development of all staff, which includes supporting and mentoring staff to ensure suitably challenging and engaging learning opportunities are offered to gifted students in all classes.


In the classrooms


20160308_142731.jpg


IMG_7287.JPG

2e Twice Exceptional - The Movie

People with high IQs really DO see the world differently: Researchers find they process sensory information differently

People with high IQs really DO see the world differently: Researchers find they process sensory information differently

Experts found that a high IQ brain was better able to block out larger or more irrelevant images when focussing on a small moving object But surprisingly, when tested with larger objects, people with a high IQ were slower to see what was right in front of them Scientists say this explains why some brains are more efficient than others People with high IQ scores aren't just more intelligent - they also process sensory information differently, according to new study.

What Are Dabrowski's Five Overexcitabilities in Gifted Children?

Why Gifted Children Have Social and Emotional Behavior Problems

Is It A Cheetah?

Is It a Cheetah?

By Stephanie S. Tolan © 1996 Stephanie S. Tolan It's a tough time to raise, teach or be a highly gifted child. As the term "gifted" and the unusual intellectual capacity to which that term refers become more and more politically incorrect, the educational establishment changes terminology and focus.

How can I get my child assessed?

How can I get my child assessed?


At St Mary’s we collect a range of assessment data on students which includes ability and achievement tests, along with teacher and parent nominations and observations to help us identify gifted students. Individual IQ  assessments need to be done externally by trained psychologists. Please contact your child’s class teacher to discuss this further if this is an area you would like to investigate.


Useful resources and Links









SENG - http://sengifted.org/

How can gifted students be identified?

Identification

How can gifted students be identified?

Gifted students can be assessed in many ways and parents can provide information that can aid the assessment process.  Effective identification includes different types of criteria.

 Qualitative (subjective): These are judgements made on structured observations
eg  checklists of behaviours, nominations by teachers, parents, peers, information about the child’s interests, etc

Quantitative (objective): These include tests of ability or achievement. Eg. IQ tests,  general ability tests, standardised tests of achievement


Effective identification includes elements of both as well as indicators of underachievement.

                                                                                   (Merrick & Targett. 2004. AGQTP Module 2)

What are some characteristics of gifted students?

What are some characteristics of gifted students?

Gifted children show distinguishing characteristics from an early age. These traits are not exclusive to gifted students and not all gifted students possess all of them, but they may be present to a greater degree.  

(Source: Silverman, 1993 p. 53)


Gifted students may also display (negative) challenging characteristics.

What does gifted mean?

GIFTED EDUCATION


‘I have come that they may have life and have it to the full’ John 10:10
The Gifted Education Policy for systemic Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Sydney is set within the context of the Church’s mission to evangelise, and is founded upon the Vision and Mission Statements and the Archbishop’s Charter for Catholic Schools.


Pope Francis in his book ‘Education for Choosing Life’ refers to education as ‘an act of hope’. Faith and the Christian vision of humanity fuel that hope. As partners in Catholic Education, Sydney Catholic Schools are committed to supporting this challenge by Pope Francis to fuel hope in all our students through fostering the attainment of their full human potential.


Our Archbishop’s Charter amplifies this challenge in item 2, where our schools are called to:


“Nurture students’ love of learning through a Catholic pedagogy that fosters the development of the intellect, moral knowledge, understanding and reasoning in a relational, social and cultural context.”


(The Archbishop’s Charter for Catholic Schools, Archdiocese of Sydney, Item 2, July 2011)

According to Gagne’s definitions and model (2009) gifted students represent about ten per cent of the student population in Sydney Catholic Schools. This calls for a differentiated response in every school to the educational needs of these students. At St Mary’s we believe that all learners have the right to receive an education that is responsive to their needs and the provision of an appropriate educational program for the gifted is an issue of equity.


What does gifted mean?

Our Gifted Education policy adopts Gagne’s definitions of giftedness and talent as identified in his Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent (2010, DMGT 2.0).  


Giftedness designates the possession and use of untrained and spontaneously expressed outstanding natural abilities or aptitudes (called gifts), in at least one ability domain, to a degree that places an individual at least among the top 10% of age peers.  


Talent designates the outstanding mastery of systematically developed competencies (knowledge and skills) in at least one field of human activity to a degree that places an individual at least among the top 10% of ‘learning peers’ (those who have accumulated a similar amount of learning time from either current or past training)(Gagne, 2010, p. 82).


Underachievers are defined as students who show a discrepancy between their school performance and some index of his or her actual ability.  (Davis & Rimm 2004)

Monday, 13 June 2016

SENG



SENG - http://sengifted.org/


AAEGT

GERRIC

Wednesday, 8 June 2016

9 Things the World Must Understand About Gifted Children

9 Things the World Must Understand About Gifted Children

Envy, competitiveness, lack of compassion and resentfulness are emotions others may feel towards gifted children because they are intellectually advanced. And our gifted children seem to be very much affected by these negative emotions cast on them from others- from both adults and children. Why?